Making of a modern masterpiece

Design — 18.12.18 BY Jill Stockbridge

Cabinet Alberto Pinto produced their most modern interior design to date for an Asian client with an ACJ319 aircraft. Yves Pickardt, Head of VIP Aircraft Interior Department, explains the influences and the process.

There are many different influences on the interior design of each widebody private jet, from safety considerations, environmental concerns, weight, scope of use, and simply down to the taste and preference of the owner. When Alberto Pinto Design won a contract for a privately owned ACJ319, the designers found that the Chinese businessman who owned the aircraft wanted to include references to many different elements that were important to him, from the carbon fibre of his sports cars, to the colour of his favourite jacket.

Cabinet Alberto Pinto has worked on many large private aircraft, including both BBJs and ACJs, and their expertise in the market and creativity drew the owner of a new ACJ319 to ask them for suggestions for the interior design of his jet. The client requested design concepts from three companies, but chose the presentation from Alberto Pinto.

 
 

It was the beginning of a two-year project, which saw a nose to tail completion including 10 business class seats, night configuration for sleeping, VIP shower, two VIP lavatories and a VIP aft galley.

The concept was based on an interesting brief from the owner, as Yves Pickardt, Head of VIP Aircraft Interior Department, explains: “The owner insisted that we fulfil his dream of a very modern cabin with a true ‘wow effect’. He loves and owns very special sport cars including Koenigseggs and McLarens, and therefore asked us to incorporate as much carbon fibre as possible in the design. We considered carefully and came up with our proposed designs. We only presented one concept, which he was happy with.”

 
 
 
 

Pickardt feels there were two elements that won him over. “Certainly, the quality of the seat design first, and then the clever layout that allows for two real bedrooms in a medium-size aircraft.”

He continues: “The colour mood is quite simple: black, white and yellow. White is the main background colour in the aircraft. The black element is introduced through the carbon fibre. Yellow because the owner loved a yellow leather jacket he bought in Beverly Hills and wanted the same here and there in the cabin. He especially wanted the yellow at the head of his bed, with a large circle, which is a symbol of good luck in China.”

The circle motif was continued throughout the aircraft, in background decoration and larger art installations.

 
 

There were challenges in the design, as the owner required two bedrooms, not normally found in this size aircraft and a possible cause of weight issues. Pickardt adds: “The expected wow effect is always a challenge. There is no real specification, only a dream, which we have to realise for the owner. We did that with the most modern design we have ever produced.”

As well as the carbon fibre, leather, LED lighting and optical fibres, there were some special and unique touches incorporated into the design. Pickardt explains: “The wall and window panels were created with a very refined design, made of lines, grooves and tokens, and the seats were fully custom designed for this aircraft.”

The result is a clean modern design, pale background offset with shiny black and yellow highlights, with unusual elements that give the wow factor.

 
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